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CCST Publications

Nanoscience and Nanotechnology: Opportunities and Challenges in California

Release date: January, 2004

The project was completed in January of 2004 and was conducted by a team of experts including representatives from the state government and the Semiconductor Industry Association. The project planning, execution and reports were reviewed internally by CCST members and externally by peer review process. The project took into account and was coordinated with reviews and analyses at the national level including the National Science Foundation, the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the National Academies.

The briefing consists of an annotated analysis of the literature, recent reports, conferences and other means of information dissemination on nanotechnology. Six chapters were prepared to reflect possible applicability to California. Policy recommendations were discussed and documented by CCST in a seventh chapter.

  • Nanotechnology - Why Is This a Special Length Scale?
    Robert Haddon (Distinguished Professor of Chemistry, UCR) and Sandip Niyogi (Ph.D. student in chemistry, UCR)
  • Formation and Transformation of Industries: Nanotechnology
    Michael Darby (Warren C. Cordner Professor of Money and Financial Markets, UCLA) and Lynne Zucker (Professor of Sociology and Policy Studies, UCLA)
  • Nanotechnology Commercialization Best Practices
    Anthony A. Waitz (Quantum Insight)
  • California's Unique Position as a Nanotechnology Leader
    Wasiq Bokhari (CEO Quantum Insight)
  • Preparing California's Workforce for the Nanotechnology Industrial Revolution
    Gus A. Koehler (Time Structures)
  • The Social and Ethical Impacts of Nanotechnology
    Edward V. Etzkorn (Ph.D. student in materials science, UCSB) and Susan Hackwood (CCST)
  • Plannings for California's Future in Nanotechnology: Recommendations
    California Council on Science and Technology

Principal recommendations:

  • For the California Congressional Delegation: Support implementation of the Boehlert-Honda 21st Century Nanotechnology R&D Act
  • For the California Legislature: Create a Select Committee on New and Emerging Technologies in each house of the Legislature.
  • For the Governor's Office: Establish a Nanotechnology Research and Workforce Advisory Council, staffed by the Governor's Office of Planning and Research,
  • For the Secretary of Education: Create a K-12 Science and Engineering Initiative including nanotechnology.
  • For the Governor's Office of Planning and Research: Recommend changes in tax incentives and local land zoning to foster manufacturing spin-off locations within California.
  • For the California Community College, State College and University systems: Create a research and technician workforce training plan for California and implement appropriate curricula and major options to support nanotechnology training.
  • For CA State Government Agencies and Departments: Additional recommendations are offered for the health and environmental protection related agencies, the Labor and Workforce Development Agency and the Business, Transportation, and Housing Agency.

"If managed smartly, nanotechnology has the potential to bring jobs and wealth to California. It is the next wave of technology. It's our decision to ride it and make the most of it - or be overwhelmed by it.

-John Vasconcellos, California State Senator, 21st Century Committee Co-Chair


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